Author Archives: Licentiam Team

Licentiam testifies at D.C. Health Committee Oversight Hearing on expedited medical licensure to address growing demand of telemedicine

Committee on Health

Vincent C. Gray, Chairperson

Health Professional Boards Oversight Hearing

March 1, 2017, 11:00 A.M.

Wilson Building, Washington, D.C.

(Official Text)

Good morning honorable Chairman Gray, esteemed members of the Committee on Health, and district residents. My name is Timothy Stephens, and I am the public health advisor to Licentiam. Licentiam is a health regulatory technology company building innovative technologies to expedite both the medical licensure process and the sharing of licensing information between states. Mr. Mark Vargas, President of Licentiam, sends his deep regrets for not being here with you today. However, he has asked me to answer any questions the Council may have on how innovative technologies can help medical Boards be more responsive to their applicants and help build the workforce capacity of health professionals in the District.

Today, I’d like to talk about several important disruptors relevant to the licensure of health professionals. The first is the dramatic acceleration of the practice of telemedicine. Consider: in 2013, 350,000 U.S. patients used telemedicine. And, in 2018 it is projected that over 7 million patients will be seen virtually. In terms of economic growth, telemedicine is projected to be a $20 billion industry.

What’s most remarkable is the increase in the number of physicians entering the practice of telemedicine. A recent national survey found that 67% of physicians practice, or plan to practice telemedicine over the next two years. Telemedicine is quickly growing because of the access to medical care it creates for patients, its ability to alleviate health professional shortages and the unprecedented demands on the healthcare system. Additionally, studies have found that telemedicine can help meet health needs for disabled residents and ones who are not physically able to leave their home.

Simultaneous to the explosion of telemedicine is the unprecedented demand for physicians to hold multiple medical licenses in various states they practice. Our Licentiam researchers found that many, if not all the licensing systems used by state Medical Boards, such as the one used by the DC Department of Health, are outdated, causing significant delays and unnecessary vulnerabilities in the licensing process – a source of frustration for both physician applicants, as well as, the excellent employees at DOH that work in the license processing center. But, ultimately, the true sufferers are patients who have less access to medical care. Think about these statistics in DC; the average length of time it takes the DC Board of Medicine to approve a clean license application for a doctor can be up to 60 days. If the average physician sees 15 patients a day, and the annual number of new medical licenses in DC is about 1000 – that’s roughly 900,000 patients that could have seen a doctor during the time it took to manually process and issue a medical license. The core problem is that the licensing systems are using 2001 technologies to address 2017 demands.

The second issue I’d like to discuss is patient safety. Last year, the D.C. Superior Court found a former DC licensed nurse guilty of sexually assaulting three patients in the emergency rooms of 3 DC hospitals between 2013 and 2014. It was previously reported by the Washington Post that the nurse continued to work in D.C. and Maryland despite such allegations, where additional abuse cases could have been prevented if states had shared investigation information. But DC isn’t alone. Just last month, the Tucson Sentinel reported that the Arizona medical boards can take years to penalize doctors who overprescribe.

So, what’s the common denominator? The answer is quite simple: The District and states are still using outdated technologies and licensing systems that restrict government regulators from sharing licensure, investigations and conduct reports across state lines in a timely fashion. The rapid, two-way sharing of information is critical to patient safety! The theme again is – we are using 2001 technologies that are creating a 2017 problem.

In conclusion, I urge this committee to explore ways to integrate innovation and the latest technologies to address these pressing issues. This committee has documented the challenges of diabetes, HIV and other significant comorbid health issues in the District. Moreover, the DC Board of Medicine confirmed the ongoing shortage of qualified physicians in their most recent Physician Workforce Capacity Survey, and reported that both Wards 5 and 7 are fully designated as “Health Professional Shortage Areas”. By addressing known deficiencies in licensing system technologies our entire community and residents can better their access to qualified health professionals. We urge your Committee and the Department of Health to make the District an attractive place for physicians to practice medicine, and telemedicine.

Thank you for the opportunity to provide testimony on behalf of Licentiam

 

D.C. Committee on Health Oversight Hearing link:

http://dc.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?view_id=2&clip_id=3773

 

Licentiam Meets with Cuban Ambassador to the U.S. During Chicago Visit to Discuss Expedited Physician Licensing Platform

mark-cuban-ambassador

Licentiam Meets with Cuban Ambassador in Chicago Office

Chicago, IL –Licentiam President Mark Vargas met with Cuban Ambassador to the United States Jose Cabanas on Monday during the Ambassador’s 2-day visit to Chicago. The Ambassador was in town to meet with local business and political leaders to promote business opportunities in Cuba.

“I was honored to brief the Ambassador on our next generation RegTech platform to expedite physician licensing,” said Licentiam’s Mark Vargas. “I look forward to continuing our dialogue with the Ambassador and his team to improve health outcomes and patient safety both here in the United States and in Cuba.”

Licentiam is one of 12 companies recently named to Chicago 1871’s first Hispanic tech startup accelerator program in collaboration with the Illinois Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.  As part of the 12-week program, the tech companies will be provided educational programming, resources, technological support and guidance toward raising funding.

About the Illinois Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (IHCC)

The Illinois Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (IHCC) is the leading Hispanic business, networking, advocacy and development organization in the state of Illinois. IHCC empowers entrepreneurs to start and grow their businesses. We are a community of business owners, entrepreneurs and professionals committed to empowering individuals through economic growth. With decades of combined business experience, IHCC engages entrepreneurs through community advocacy, networking, and innovative one-on-one training designed to help them be leaders and agents of change in today’s world. We contribute to the financial strength of the economy by helping businesses create jobs, increase their revenue and be more profitable. For more info visit www.ihccbusiness.net.

About 1871

1871 is the home of almost 500 early-stage, high-growth digital startups. Located in The Merchandise Mart, this 130,000 square foot facility is also the headquarters of nationally recognized accelerators Techstars Chicago and the Good Food Business Accelerator; impact investing fund Impact Engine; half a dozen industry-specific incubators in key areas such as real estate, education technology, food and financial technology; several emerging tech talent schools (Fullstack Academy, Actualize, Future Founders, Designation and Evolve Security Academy), and the state’s leading technology advocate, the Illinois Science and Technology Coalition. It is the second home to Chicago-based VCs, Pritzker Group Venture Capital, MATH Venture Partners, Hyde Park Angels, OCA Ventures, OurCrowd and Chicago Ventures, as well as satellite offices for DePaul University, Northwestern University, University of Illinois, University of Chicago, Loyola University Chicago, Illinois Institute of Technology and DeVry. 1871 has fast become recognized as the hub for the city’s entrepreneurial/technology ecosystem and has been featured in Inc. Magazine, TechCrunch, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Chicago Tribune and Crain’s Chicago Business among other top media. 1871 is the flagship project of the Chicagoland Entrepreneurial Center.

Licentiam One of 12 Companies Named to Chicago 1871’s First Hispanic Tech Accelerator Program

1871 And The Illinois Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Announce First Cohort Of Joint Accelerator 

November 10, 2016

Chicago-based technology incubator 1871 and the Illinois Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (IHCC) announced Thursday the 12 businesses that make up the first cohort of a new incubator focused on fostering opportunities for Hispanic-owned technology companies. As part of the 12-week program, the tech companies will be provided educational programming, resources, technological support and guidance toward raising funding.

“IHCC is pleased to partner with 1871 to help develop this next generation of LatinX innovative entrepreneurs,” said Omar Duque, President & CEO of IHCC. “We’re excited about the businesses and entrepreneurs in our inaugural cohort and we’re looking forward to exploring ways we can help grow and expand their businesses and connect them with our communities.”

The joint incubator provides the businesses within the cohort direct access to mentors from a variety of backgrounds, and tailored content designed specifically for the individual businesses.

“Building diversity and inclusion in the tech community is a core pillar of 1871’s efforts, and this new accelerator is a crucial addition to our ongoing efforts,” said Howard A. Tullman, 1871 CEO. “Through a strong partnership with IHCC, these companies will be provided access to all manner of resources and opportunities that will accelerate their growth.”

Member companies in the first cohort include:

1871 has previously partnered with Chicago Urban League, CODE2040, ImBlackinTech, Ms. Tech, Code Latino and many other organizations in an effort to increase opportunities for underserved entrepreneurs. The Hispanic technology incubator is supported by a number of organizations, including JPMorgan Chase and Wintrust Financial.

“I am incredibly excited to be part of the first IHCC and 1871 cohort,” said Victoria Nones, founder of Women in Comedy. “Gaining valuable resources and education in order to further the efforts of my company, Women In Comedy, will be monumental. I can’t wait to collaborate with other Latinx entrepreneurs and am grateful for the opportunity.”

The accelerator is directed by Manny Ozaeta, who brings extensive knowledge of 1871, its member companies, and a strong understanding of the Hispanic business community. Ozaeta was previously 1871’s director of membership and has worked for a variety of organizations in Chicago, including Culloton Strategies and the Office of Mayor Rahm Emanuel.

“Being a part of the IHCC and 1871 program is an incredible opportunity to create meaningful relationships within the Latinx and 1871 communities and take my work at Paladin to the next level,” said Kristen Sonday, co-founder and COO of Paladin. “I’m grateful for the mentorship and resources provided through the program and look forward to contributing to the future of Latinx entrepreneurs in Chicago.”

For more information on the program, or to speak with one of the cohort members, email press@1871.com

About the Illinois Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (IHCC)

The Illinois Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (IHCC) is the leading Hispanic business, networking, advocacy and development organization in the state of Illinois. IHCC empowers entrepreneurs to start and grow their businesses. We are a community of business owners, entrepreneurs and professionals committed to empowering individuals through economic growth. With decades of combined business experience, IHCC engages entrepreneurs through community advocacy, networking, and innovative one-on-one training designed to help them be leaders and agents of change in today’s world. We contribute to the financial strength of the economy by helping businesses create jobs, increase their revenue and be more profitable. For more info visit www.ihccbusiness.net.

About 1871

1871 is the home of almost 500 early-stage, high-growth digital startups. Located in The Merchandise Mart, this 130,000 square foot facility is also the headquarters of nationally recognized accelerators Techstars Chicago and the Good Food Business Accelerator; impact investing fund Impact Engine; half a dozen industry-specific incubators in key areas such as real estate, education technology, food and financial technology; several emerging tech talent schools (Fullstack Academy, Actualize, Future Founders, Designation and Evolve Security Academy), and the state’s leading technology advocate, the Illinois Science and Technology Coalition. It is the second home to Chicago-based VCs, Pritzker Group Venture Capital, MATH Venture Partners, Hyde Park Angels, OCA Ventures, OurCrowd and Chicago Ventures, as well as satellite offices for DePaul University, Northwestern University, University of Illinois, University of Chicago, Loyola University Chicago, Illinois Institute of Technology and DeVry. 1871 has fast become recognized as the hub for the city’s entrepreneurial/technology ecosystem and has been featured in Inc. Magazine, TechCrunch, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Chicago Tribune and Crain’s Chicago Business among other top media. 1871 is the flagship project of the Chicagoland Entrepreneurial Center.

Licentiam Participates in Hispanic Entrepreneur Small Business Roundtable with U.S. Senator Dick Durbin

image11491Licentiam Team’s Mark Vargas participated in a Hispanic entrepreneur small business roundtable with U.S. Senator Dick Durbin of Illinois on October 14th in Chicago. As the Assistant Minority Leader, Sen. Durbin is the second highest ranking Democrat in leadership in the Senate. The event was co-hosted by the Illinois Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and 1871. During the briefing with Sen. Durbin, Mr. Vargas outlined Licentiam’s expedited physician licensing capability and health regulatory tools via a next generation RegTech platform.

“The Licentiam platform is unique, in that it will not only expedite the process for a physician to obtain their medical license, but it will also assist pharmaceutical companies in getting their drugs to the market faster,” said Mark Vargas. “By utilizing next generation RegTech tools, we’ll be able to expedite processes that in turn, will dramatically improve overall health outcomes across the U.S.”